Trending

Shipping Costs at Record Highs As Bottleneck Problems Continue

11
2
English
日本語

There’s no doubt about it. Shipping both internationally and domestically continues to pose significant problems. It doesn’t matter if you are importing or exporting, orders are delayed and it’s not without good reason.  Recently, at the port of Los Angeles, there were forty-two ships waiting to unload their cargo. And it’s not just the west coast – a similar scenario is taking place at every major port in the United States and elsewhere throughout the world.

Ships stacking up at San Francisco Bay

In California, the worsening coronavirus has led to a reduction in the amount of dock workers and this coupled with increased volumes of cargo continues to slow things down.  Lack of storage space is a big problem with most warehouses within a few hours of the ports filled to capacity.  Unless the import container is being delivered directly to the end user the delays can be significant.

That is, if you can find a trucker.  And the chassis for your container – many are in disrepair and need rebuilding and servicing.

Ships wait to unload Port of Los Angeles

The cost to ship a container of product has risen by 80% since early November – a triple increase since March 2020.  Let’s say a reefer container originally cost you $3000 to ship.  Expect your cost to be about $9000 per container now – if you can even get one.  The cost of shipping a container of goods has risen by 80 percent since early November and has nearly tripled over the past year, according to the Freightos Baltic Index Container.”

Container bookings used to be honored but that is long gone.  Often truckers will go to port to pick up the empties and suddenly the booking is invalid or there is just no equipment – even though the booking was made weeks, even months before. Or, as they deliver your loaded container to the dock they are told – no more containers being received today (even though you have a firm delivery appointment.)   Your shipment (and your customer) is now on hold.

Port delays leave ships stranded off pacific coast gateways

The supply chain is broken and will take a long time to get back to normal, if ever.  Think back just a year ago to February 2020, the onset of the covid-19 pandemic and when this all began in Wuhan, China.  Up to that time (late January 2020) shipments from China to the USA and other countries were fairly regular, with the usual slowdown and reduction of shipping activity due to the approaching celebration of the Chinese Lunar New Year.

Then came covid-19 along with temporary trade restrictions and higher duties on product coming into the United States.  Things slowed down, including demand as U.S. and consumers worldwide went into lockdown and did not frequent entertainment venues or restaurants.  The food service industry changed dramatically, and grocery stores thrived.  People bought more frozen food and canned goods. New food take-out businesses and delivery styles blossomed as working from home became the norm. 

And from a logistics standpoint steamship companies took action due to lack of demand to remove some vessels from certain trade routes thus reducing the availability of containers both reefer and dry. Thousands of empty containers remain stranded throughout the world.

Then suddenly, in the second half of 2020, demand for Asian goods picked up in the U.S. as American consumers began to shop again.  Unable to eat out or spend their dollars at entertainment venues, people started buying imported goods in record amounts from clothing and furniture to shoes. The holiday season was coming.  This “abrupt and unprecedented spending shift has upended long-standing trade patterns, causing bottlenecks from the gates of Chinese factories to the doorsteps of U.S. homes” as well as to many other countries throughout the world.

Global food exports paralyzed by port problems

Suddenly, reefer and dry containers that were no longer in regular service, were now in high demand as factories revamped to meet new covid-19 safety protocol and increased production for the unexpected influx of orders.  Congestion developed at ports with long waiting times resulting in disruption and delays and of course, higher costs.

These factors plus many more, contributed to a broken supply chain and the logistical nightmare facing most shippers today. When this pandemic is over things will not exactly return to “normal.”  The new Biden administration is already pushing (by mandate) that federal agencies must purchase products “Made in America”, making it harder for theses agencies to buy imported goods. Throughout the world there is pressure to increase domestic production and create more jobs at home.  There will continue to be shipping problems and logistical issues because these things do not right themselves quickly.

But there are some things never change.  And that is our determination and promise here at Noon International to provide you, our customers and suppliers with the best possible service from farm to fork and procurement to delivery.  Although this pandemic turmoil has brought to light many vulnerabilities in the supply chain, it is everyone’s responsibility to recognize them for what they are – they are only temporary.  Thank you for your patience during this time. We remain committed to finding ways for our businesses to work better and more profitably together today and in the future.

Lily Noon

References:

  1. Shipping Costs Quadruple to Record Highs on China-Europe Bottleneck, Financial Times, George Steer and Valentina Romel, www.ft.com
  2. Container Shortages the Biggest Disruptor, The Loadstar, Mike Wackett, www.theloadstar.com
  3. Drewry: Blanked Sailings Contributed to Container Shortages, The Maritime Executive, www.maritime-executive.com
  4. Costco Expects Container Shortages Through March, The Supply Chain Dive, Emma Cosgrove, www.supplychaindrive.com
  5. Where Are All the Containers? The Global Shortage Explained, Hillebrand, www.hillebrand.com

疑いの余地はありません。国内・国際の輸送コストが引き続き大きな問題となっています。輸出か輸入かにかかわらず、納品に遅れが生じていて、それには確たる理由があります。最近ではロサンゼルス港で42隻の貨物船が荷揚げを待っている状態でした。これは西海岸だけの問題ではなく、米国のすべての主要港、および世界各地で、同様の事態が発生しています。

サンフランシスコ湾に停泊する貨物船

カリフォルニア州では、新型コロナウイルス感染症の悪化を受けて港湾ターミナルの労働者が減ったうえ、貨物の輸送量が増えていることから、荷動きがますます遅くなっています。倉庫の不足は大問題です。港湾から2、3時間以内の距離にある倉庫のほとんどが、容量に達しています。輸入コンテナをエンドユーザーに直接配達しないかぎり、かなりの遅延になる可能性があります。

そのうえ、輸送用のトラックを見つけるのも一苦労です。コンテナを積むためのシャーシ(トレーラー)も不足しています。壊れているものが多くて、修理や再構築が必要だからです。

ロサンゼルス港で荷下ろしを待つコンテナ

製品の入ったコンテナの輸送コストは、11月初旬から80%も高騰しました。2020年3月と比べると3倍です。冷蔵コンテナ1本の輸送コストが、本来なら3,000ドルのところ、今では9,000ドル前後になっているということです。ただし、コンテナを見つけられればの話です。Freightos Baltic Index Containerによると、物流コンテナの輸送コストは、11月初旬から80%上昇し、過去1年間で3倍近く上昇した」。

以前なら予約しておけばコンテナが手に入りましたが、それが確約されたのは昔の話です。最近では、トラック運転手が空のコンテナを取りに行くつもりで港湾に行ってみると、予約がキャンセルされていて受け取れるものが何もないことが、しばしば起こっています。数週間前、数カ月前に予約しておいても同じことです。あるいは、貨物を満載したコンテナを指定の埠頭に届けに行くと、(たとえ配達の予約が確定していたとしても)その日のコンテナ受け取りは終了しているということもあります。皆さん(とそのお客さん)の商品の出荷は、現在保留されています。

港湾の遅延により太平洋側の沖合に船舶が停泊

サプライチェーンは完全に滞っていて、いつか平常に戻ることがあるとしても、長い時間がかかるでしょう。わずか1年前の2020年2月、中国・武漢から新型コロナウイルス感染症が広まり始めたばかりの頃を思い出してみてください。それまで(2020年1月末まで)は、中国から米国や他国への海運はほぼ平常どおりに動いていました。中国の春節のために輸送量が減ってスローダウンしていましたが、これも例年どおりでした。

そこにコロナが発生したうえ、米国への輸入品に関する一時的な貿易制限と関税引き上げがありました。この結果、需要が落ち込みました。米国をはじめ世界中がロックダウンに入り、消費者が娯楽施設やレストランに行かなくなりました。外食産業は激変し、食料品店が繁盛しました。冷凍食品や缶詰食品を買う人が増えました。在宅勤務が普通になると、テイクアウトとデリバリーを主体とする新しいフードビジネスが花開きました。

物流という点では、需要不足を受けて商船会社が対応に走り、一部の貿易ルートの船舶を廃止し、冷凍/冷蔵・ドライともにコンテナの提供数を減らしました。数千本という空のコンテナが、世界各地で置き去りにされました。

ところが、2020年下半期になると、アジア製の産品に対する米国からの需要が突如として拡大しました。米国の消費者が、また買い物をするようになったのです。レストランや娯楽施設で消費しなくなった資金が、輸入品の購入に回り、衣類や家具は記録的な売れ行きを見せるようになりました。年末商戦も近付きつつありました。この「前例のない突然の消費変動により、長らく保たれてきた貿易のパターンが根こそぎにされ、中国の工場から米国の一般家庭へと至るルート上にある港湾にボトルネックを引き起こした」うえ、世界の他の多くの国にも同じ状況をもたらしました。

港湾の問題で世界の食品輸出が麻痺状態に

こうして、常時使用されなくなっていた冷凍/冷蔵・ドライコンテナに、今度は突然の需要が集中しました。コロナ対策を導入して体制を整え直した工場が、予想外の怒涛の注文に対応すべく、生産を拡大しました。港湾で混雑が発生して待ち時間が長くなった結果、中断や遅延、そして言うまでもなく価格高騰が発生しました。

これら以外にも多数の要因が加担して、サプライチェーンが支障を来たし、現在ほとんどの船荷主が直面している物流の悪夢につながったというわけです。今のパンデミックが収束しても、物事が完全な「平常」に戻ることはなさそうです。バイデン大統領の新政権は、すでに連邦政府の省庁に対して「米国産」の物品を購入するよう義務付けていて、これら省庁が輸入品を調達するのは困難になりつつあります。米国だけでなく世界中で、国内生産を拡大して国内に雇用を創出しようとする圧力が高まっています。船舶と物流の問題は、短期にひとりでに解消するものではありませんから、今後も継続するでしょう。

でも、決して変わらないこともあります。それは、農家から食卓へ、調達から配達へと至るまで、できるかぎりベストのサービスをお客様とサプライヤーの皆様にお届けしていくという、私たちNoon Internationalの決意と約束です。このパンデミックが引き起こした激変により、サプライチェーンの脆弱性が数多く明るみに出されましたが、現実を正しく認識すること、すなわち一時的な状況なのだと認識することは、全員の責任です。今の状況に対する皆様のご理解にお礼を申しあげます。今後も業務体制を改善するための方法を見つけ、現在と未来の収益性を高めていく所存です。

Lily Noon

 

 

参考文献:

  1. Shipping Costs Quadruple to Record Highs on China-Europe Bottleneck(輸送コストが4倍で史上最高に、中欧のボトルネックが原因)、Financial Times、George Steer、Valentina Romel、ft.com
  2. Container Shortages the Biggest Disruptor(コンテナ不足が最大の障害)、The Loadstar、Mike Wackett、theloadstar.com
  3. Drewry: Blanked Sailings Contributed to Container Shortages(Drewry報告書:船舶の運航停止がコンテナ不足の一因)、The Maritime Executive、maritime-executive.com
  4. Costco Expects Container Shortages Through March(コストコ、3月末までコンテナ不足の見通し)、The Supply Chain Dive、Emma Cosgrove、supplychaindrive.com
  5. Where Are All the Containers? The Global Shortage Explained(コンテナはいったいどこへ消えたのか?世界的な不足状況を解説)、Hillebrand、hillebrand.com

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.